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The Tri-agency Open Access Policy is modelled after the open access policy in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, which went into effect in 2008. It requires researchers to make their published research available for free to the public within 12 months of publication.

The major research funding agencies in Canada are looking for feedback on a policy that will require federally-funded research in peer-reviewed journals to be freely available to the public within one year of publication.

Starting today, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada are consulting a wide range of people in the scientific community on a draft of the new Tri-agency Open Access Policy. The draft will be available for viewing and for comment online until December 13, 2013. The feedback received during this time will be considered by NSERC while shaping the final form of the policy and how it will be implemented. 

“Making research results as widely available and accessible as possible is an essential part of advancing knowledge and maximizing the benefits of publicly funded research for Canadians,“ NSERC said on a website announcing the consultation.

The Tri-agency Open Access Policy is modelled after the open access policy at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, which went into effect in 2008.

Normally, journals that are not open access can only be read by people and institutions that have a subscription. Open access allows more scientists, clinicians, policymakers, and the public to access and use advancements in science and health.