Canadian satellite Cassiope to collect new data on 'space storms'

The Canadian satellite Cassiope will make its second launch attempt aboard a rocket on Sunday after delays earlier this month. It's stated purpose is to unravel "the mysteries of space weather."

Space agency says satellite to attempt second launch Sunday in California

The Canadian satellite Cassiope will make its second launch attempt on Sunday after delays earlier this month in what is being billed as an attempt to figure out "the mysteries of space weather."

The Canadian Space Agency said the satellite will lift off from Vandenberg, Calif, on the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, sometime after 12 p.m. ET.

Canada is looking to make a significant contribution to unravelling the mysteries of space weather.- Canadian Space Agency

"Canada is looking to make a significant contribution to unravelling the mysteries of space weather," the agency said.

Cassiope, the short form for the Cascade SmallSat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer, was scheduled to launch earlier this month but was delayed after tests confirmed it wasn't ready to go.

The satellite's mission was developed by the Canadian Space Agency together with 10 Canadian universities. The University of Calgary and several research teams led the initiative.

The agency said Cassiope will allow scientists to collect "new data on space storms in Earth's upper atmosphere and assess their potential impacts."

The launch will be broadcast live on the SpaceX website.

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