The team of scholars behind Vote Compass gave Canada's five political parties the opportunity to take part in the process to ensure the parties' policies lined up with the way Vote Compass interprets respondents' answers.

All five parties had the chance to answer the Vote Compass questionnaire for themselves, and were given the opportunity to challenge the assessments before the "final codes" went in.

Here are the party positions on three questions about Quebec in the Vote Compass questionnaire, and what was behind those answers. Over the coming days, CBC News will look at each of the 10 Vote Compass issue areas.

1) The federal government should have a say when it comes to decisions about culture in Quebec

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Neither agree nor disagree
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree
  • Don't know

Bloc Québécois — Strongly disagree

Text not available in English

Historiquement, le gouvernement du Québec réclame les pouvoirs lui permettant de veiller à l’épanouissement de sa culture. La ministre de la Culture du Québec a récemment « réitér[é] la volonté du gouvernement du Québec d’entreprendre, avec le gouvernement du Canada, des discussions relatives à la conclusion d’une entente en culture et d’une entente en communications ». Le Bloc Québécois appuie évidemment cette demande.

Source : Position principale 2011 (fevrier 2011)

New Democratic Party —  Somewhat disagree

New Democrats believe in: Recognizing the national character of Quebec, based in particular on a society with French as the language of work and the common language of the public domain; a unique culture expressed through a sense of identity and belonging to Quebec; a specific history; and political, economic, cultural and social institutions of its own; Affirming asymmetrical federalism, recognizing Quebec’s need for appropriate tools to meet its unique challenges; Recognizing that Quebec can withdraw, with compensation, from federal programs that fall within its jurisdiction; Supporting Quebec’s role in promoting the French culture in North America, while respecting the right of linguistic minorities within and outside Quebec.

Source: Governing in an Inclusive and Fair Canada

Green Party — Strongly disagree

The Green Party of Canada is a grassroots party with a global perspective. We are all planetary citizens, but determine our rights and responsibilities based on our local empowerment. As such, the Green Party of Canada respects the rights of Quebecers to determine their own future.

Green Party MPs will [...] Respect the right of self-determination for the people of Quebec; Support Quebec's official representation at UNESCO and ensure that if Quebec and the federal representative do not agree upon a matter then Canada would abstain.

Source: Quebec's Place in Canada (January 2010)

Conservative Party  — Somewhat disagree

During a ceremony today in the Quebec National Assembly’s Red Room, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Quebec Premier Jean Charest signed an agreement establishing a formal role for Quebec in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

 "Today we welcome Quebec into the UNESCO family, as we promised we would on December 19 of last year," stated Prime Minister Harper. "With our signatures at the bottom of this agreement, Quebec can now participate fully in all of UNESCO’s activities, together with and through Canada’s Permanent Delegation. This agreement is a clear illustration of our vision of open federalism. We are at the dawn of a new era, an era that will see us build a strong, united, free and independent Canada in which a confident, autonomous, proud and unified Quebec can develop its full potential."

Premier Charest stressed that the agreement, which recognizes Quebec’s unique and distinct personality, confirms Quebec’s special role on the world scene. "The signing of this Agreement, based on asymmetrical federalism, ushers in a new era of partnership between our two governments. Our presence in UNESCO will give us a say in sectors that are important for Quebec’s identity, such as culture, science and education. The federal government is formally recognizing Quebec’s capacity to act on the international front."

Source: Prime Minister Harper and Premier Charest sign historic agreement establishing a formal role for Québec in UNESCO (May 5, 2006)

Liberal Party — Somewhat agree

(No further material.)

2) Quebec should be formally recognized as a nation in the Constitution

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Neither agree nor disagree
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree
  • Don't know

Bloc Québécois — Somewhat agree

Text not available in English

Le Québec forme une nation et doit être reconnu comme tel. Puisque notre statut national recouvre tous les secteurs de notre vie en société, la reconnaissance de la nation québécoise implique qu’on reconnaisse aussi sa langue, sa culture, ses atouts, ses besoins, ses intérêts, ses opinions et ses aspirations. Cependant, le Québec n'a pas signé la Constitution et le Bloc Québécois ne souhaite pas y adhérer mais plutôt s'en dégager. En outre, il n'y a aucune volonté de la part des fédéralistes d'augmenter les pouvoirs du Québec et d'en reconnaître le caractère national dans la Constitution, comme l'a démontré le Colloque du Bloc Québécois sur l'avenir du Québec dans le Canada de mai 2010.

Source : Position principale 2011 (fevrier 2011)

New Democratic Party —  Somewhat agree

New Democrats believe in: Recognizing the national character of Quebec, based in particular on a society with French as the language of work and the common language of the public domain; a unique culture expressed through a sense of identity and belonging to Quebec; a specific history; and political, economic, cultural and social institutions of its own; [...] and Creating the conditions enabling Quebec to sign the Canadian Constitution.

Source: Governing in an Inclusive and Fair Canada

Green Party — Somewhat disagree

"The Green Party will never support a motion that threatens to divide communities in Canada or within Quebec" [said Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May].

She said that the people of Quebec had made it clear that their priorities are not questions of nationhood but a healthy environment, combating climate change, defining Canada's role in Afghanistan and alleviating poverty.[...] 

According to the party's senior deputy to the leader and spokesman on international relations, David Chernushenko, the Prime Minister clearly does not understand the role nationhood is playing in the world.

"Europe is moving away from the nation as a defining feature," he said. "Europeans have concluded that the road to a prosperous and sustainable future lies in working together towards shared goals, not in national differences."

The Green Party embraces the idea of interdependence and endorses internationalism as the key to dealing with today's problems, he said.

Source: Green Party condemns Commons vote on Quebec "nation" (November 28, 2006)

Conservative Party  — Somewhat disagree

While speaking on national unity on Thursday, Harper defended his government's record of open federalism and recognizing Quebec as a nation, but said he was not interested in revisiting the debate over Quebec and the Constitution at this time.

Source: Duceppe demands Harper enshrine Quebec nation status in constitution (September 12, 2008)

 

Liberal Party — Somewhat disagree

Michael Ignatieff says he has no interest in reopening the Constitution any time soon to formally recognize Quebec as a nation.

"I think that there's no appetite in Quebec or anywhere else to open the constitutional Pandora's box at the present time," the newly minted Liberal leader told The Canadian Press.

Source: Ignatieff rules out Quebec nation in Constitution (December 18, 2008)

3) Quebec should become an independent state

  • Strongly agree
  • Somewhat agree
  • Neither agree nor disagree
  • Somewhat disagree
  • Strongly disagree
  • Don't know

Bloc Québécois — Strongly agree

Text not available in English

Le chef du Bloc Québécois, Gilles Duceppe, déclarait en février 2010 à l'Université d'Ottawa ce qui suit et qui résume bien la pensée du Bloc Québécois : « Vingt ans après Meech, le Québec est de plus en plus mal servi sur les plans économique et environnemental, comme c'est le cas en matière de langue, de culture et d'éducation. Il est clair qu'au Canada, il n'y a aucune volonté politique de répondre aux aspirations du Québec. Nous allons quand même continuer à faire notre travail et aller aussi loin que possible pour élargir la marge de manoeuvre du Québec dans le Canada. Nous allons le faire de bonne foi, comme toujours, en essayant de réaliser des gains substantiels. En même temps, en 2010, le Bloc va continuer à être un des fers de lance du mouvement souverainiste. Nous allons continuer à imaginer le Québec souverain et à mettre notre projet à jour continuellement. »

Source : Québéc souverain

New Democratic Party — Strongly disagree

For New Democrats, cooperative federalism is also asymmetrical federalism; recognizing and encouraging Quebec’s unique national character in North America, with French as the language of daily life and work.

Our federalism supports Quebec’s right to its own progressive economic and social practices, and to the development of its own sense of nationhood.

Source: Governing in an Inclusive and Fair Canada

Green Party — Somewhat disagree

Greens recognize and respect the fundamental principle of self-determination of all peoples.  The people of Quebec have a right to determine their future and destiny. While all Canada would be the poorer should Quebecers prefer a new relationship, the rest of Canada can best keep the country together by embracing values of social justice and environmental sustainability, and give Quebecers strong reasons to see themselves as Canadian by choice.

Green Party MPs will [...] Respect the right of self-determination for the people of Quebec; Recognize a clear result to a clear question in the event of a future referendum in Quebec regarding Quebec separation from Canada and forming an independent country.

Source: Quebec's place in Canada (January 2010)

Conservative Party  — Strongly disagree

The truth is that Quebecers want neither the Liberal view of federalism nor the Bloc view of independence. They’ve had 40 years to adopt one or the other and they aren’t going to. Quebecers want a stronger Quebec in a better Canada. This is a message our government has heard. We are going to turn the page. Not just by rejecting separation but by changing the debate, changing the agenda and changing the federation.

Source: Prime Minister Harper outlines his government’s priorities and open federalism approach (April 20, 2006)

Liberal Party — Strongly disagree

In a proud Canada, a bilingual Canada, a progressive and prosperous Canada, there is a place for Quebec [...] Because without that voice, without this influence, Canada is not itself.

Source: Speech to Montréal Leader’s Dinner (May 13, 2010)