The RCMP says it has evidence that indicates the attack that killed a Canadian soldier in Ottawa and resulted in a gunfight on Parliament Hill was driven by ideological and political motives.

Gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, 32, made a video recording of himself just before last week's attack, the RCMP said on Sunday. RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson said in a statement it was conducting a detailed analysis of the video and could not release it at this time.

A source familiar with the investigation told CBC's Chris Hall that in the video Zehaf-Bibeau appears to make specific reference to Canada's foreign policy as motivation for his actions and that he praises Allah in the recording. 

It appears the video was made on Tuesday, the day before the attack, and investigators are expected to make it public in the next day or two, the source told Hall. 

The national investigation remains "exceptionally active and fluid," according to police. 

RCMP also said they believe a knife Zehaf-Bibeau was carrying was taken from his aunt's property in Mont Tremblant, Que. He had lived there years earlier and appeared to have stored the knife on the property.

Authorities are still looking into the origin of the gun used in the deadly attack at the National War Memorial that left 24-year-old Cpl. Nathan Cirillo dead. Police called it an old, uncommon gun that Zehaf-Bibeau could have also hidden on the property.

Zehaf-Bibeau subsidized his pre-attack activities from his own earnings, saved while employed in the Alberta oilsands, the statement said. 

"He had access to a considerable amount of funds. We are investigating all of his disbursements in the period leading up to the attack," the RCMP said.

Harper called incident a terrorist attack

Stephen Harper has called Wednesday's shooting a terror attack, and the bloodshed raised fears that Canada is suffering reprisals for joining the U.S.-led air campaign against ISIS extremists in Iraq and Syria.

RCMP are investigating Zehaf-Bibeau's interactions with numerous individuals in the days leading up to the attack and whether they could have contributed or facilitated it, the statement said. 

Paulson said last week Zehaf-Bibeau, whose father was from Libya, may have lashed out in frustration over delays in getting a passport. Paulson said Zehaf-Bibeau's mother told police in an interview that her son had wanted to go Syria.

Susan Bibeau later denied that in a letter published by Postmedia News, saying her son told her he wanted to go to Saudi Arabia where he could study the Qur'an. RCMP confirmed to CBC News on Saturday that indeed they had made an error in transcribing the interview, and that Susan Bibeau did not mention Syria on the recording. 

Zehaf-Bibeau fatally wounded Cirillo before driving to Parliament Hill's Centre Block to find himself one unlocked door away from Harper and the entire Conservative caucus. He was eventually gunned down inside Parliament by the sergeant-at-arms of the House of Commons, Kevin Vickers.

A harrowing compilation of security video released on Thursday provided a picture of how Wednesday's attack unfolded.

Tours of the Parliament buildings will restart on Monday, and public galleries will be re-opened. 

Relatives pay respects to fallen soldier

Relatives and officials are paying their respects to Cirillo this week, as his death has sparked a national outpouring of grief.

Cirillo was standing in ceremonial guard at the monument when he was shot by Zehaf-Bibeau. 

Cirillo's family, including his young son, gathered Sunday for a private visitation at the Markey-Dermody Funeral Home in his hometown of Hamilton, Ont., where they were also joined by Ontario Lt.-Gov. Elizabeth Dowdeswell.

The funeral home says a public visitation for the 24-year-old Canadian Forces reservist is scheduled for Monday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

A regimental funeral for Cirillo is scheduled for Tuesday, and he is to be buried in a field of honour at a Hamilton cemetery.

Gunman Michael Zehaf Bibeau was shot dead after he entered Parliament, and the RCMP now say he had "ideological and political motives."

With files from CBC's Chris Hall and The Associated Press