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The Pollcast: State of the polls with 2 years to go

At the two-year mark of Justin Trudeau's Liberal government, Pollcast host Éric Grenier is joined by the CBC's Nick Gamache to discuss the latest numbers from the Poll Tracker and how it works.

Host Éric Grenier is joined by the CBC's Nick Gamache

In 2019, Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, right, will face off against Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, left, in the next federal election. (Canadian Press)

The CBC Pollcast, hosted by CBC poll analyst Éric Grenier, explores the world of electoral politics, political polls and the trends they reveal.


After two years in office, the Liberals are still the favourites to win the next election. They hold a six-point lead in the polls and could use a breakthrough in Quebec to hold on to their majority government.

But their odds have worsened after weeks of controversies surrounding Finance Minister Bill Morneau, boosting the chances that Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh can produce breakthroughs of their own in some parts of the country.

These are the conclusions that can be drawn from the CBC Poll Tracker, which combines an aggregation of all polling data with a seat projection model to help follow the trends of public opinion and provide an indication of what could happen if an election were held today.

On the latest episode of the Pollcast, host and CBC polls analyst Éric Grenier explains how the Poll Tracker works and what the polls are showing, as well as answers some reader questions, with the help of the CBC's Nick Gamache.

At the two-year mark of Justin Trudeau's Liberal government, Pollcast host Éric Grenier is joined by the CBC's Nick Gamache to discuss the latest numbers from the Poll Tracker and how it works. 34:43

Listen to the full discussion above — or subscribe to the CBC Pollcast and listen to past episodes.​

Follow Éric Grenier and Nick Gamache on Twitter.

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