PODCAST

The Pollcast: The future of the NDP and Tom Mulcair

Will Tom Mulcair survive the leadership review vote at this weekend's NDP convention in Edmonton? Host Éric Grenier is joined by NDP insider Ian Capstick to discuss the future of the NDP, with or without Tom Mulcair.

Host Éric Grenier is joined by Mediastyle's Ian Capstick

Tom Mulcair's future as leader of the NDP will be decided at this weekend's party convention in Edmonton. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

The CBC Pollcast, hosted by CBC poll analyst and ThreeHundredEight.com founder Éric Grenier, explores the world of electoral politics, political polls and the trends they reveal.


Tom Mulcair will be fighting for his political life at this weekend's NDP convention in Edmonton. But the decisions the New Democrats have to make about the future of the party go beyond just who they want as leader.

It could be very close when the 1,500 or so delegates cast their ballots in NDP Leader Tom Mulcair's leadership review. Technically, Mulcair needs 50 per cent plus one to avoid a leadership election. Practically, he may need 70 per cent or more to avoid such a contest.

But the party will be debating other issues this weekend and in the years to come. How do the New Democrats position themselves against a Liberal Party trying to crowd them out on the left? Does the path to electoral success lie to the centre or to the left of the political spectrum for the NDP?

Is U.S. Democratic Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders or UK Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn models for the NDP to emulate, or cautionary tales?

And what impact could electoral reform have on the NDP?

Joining host Éric Grenier to discuss the future of the NDP is Ian Capstick, founding partner of Mediastyle and an NDP insider.

Eric looks ahead to the NDP's convention and leadership review with Ian Capstick, a panelist on CBC's Power & Politics. 21:28

Listen to the full discussion above — or subscribe to The CBC Pollcast and listen to past episodes.

You can follow Éric Grenier and Ian Capstick on Twitter.

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