G8 trying to deter foreign worker kidnappings in Africa

British Prime Minister David Cameron is seeking a joint commitment by nations to stop paying ransoms to kidnappers in hopes of deterring the practice following January's bloody capture by al-Qaeda-linked militants of an Algerian gas facility.

British PM seeks agreement to stop paying ransoms for Western hostages

British Prime Minister David Cameron is trying to secure agreement from other G8 leaders to stop paying ransom payments when foreign workers from Western countries are kidnapped by terrorists in Africa. (Jewel Samad/AP Photo/Pool)

G8 leaders meeting in Northern Ireland Tuesday are grappling with how to prevent kidnappings of foreign workers in Africa.

British Prime Minister David Cameron is seeking a joint commitment by nations to stop paying ransoms to kidnappers in hopes of deterring the practice following January's bloody capture by al-Qaeda-linked militants of an Algerian gas facility.

Ten Japanese, five Britons, three Americans and a French national were among the 40 civilians killed as Algerian forces retook the facility.

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Hostage-taking of foreign workers for cash payments is on the rise across much of West Africa, particularly Nigeria with its own oil industry dominated by Western companies and foreign managers.

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"I want us to discuss how we crack down on terrorist ransoms because this would suffocate one of the main sources of funding for these terrorist organizations, and of course would reduce the incentive to take our citizens hostage," Cameron said ahead of Tuesday's discussions.

Cameron has also invited the leaders of Libya and the African Union to join the talks table Tuesday.