Actor Jesse Eisenberg called out for using the term 'squaw' in The New Yorker

Hollywood actor Jesse Eisenberg, star of the Facebook movie The Social Network, has come under fire on social media for a story he wrote that appears in the May 25 issue of The New Yorker magazine.

'What year is it @NewYorker? Your racism is circa 1930's,' tweeter Jamie Wilson writes

Actor Jesse Eisenberg is being criticized on social media for a humour article he wrote that appears in the latest issue of The New Yorker magazine. (Nathan Denette/Canadian Press)

Hollywood actor Jesse Eisenberg, star of the Facebook movie The Social Network, has come under fire on social media for a story he wrote that appears in the May 25 issue of The New Yorker magazine.

Eisenberg writes about a "squaw" telling a "Native American chief" to do a "rain dance." 

The article uses several different examples of characters convincing, cajoling, and threatening males into dancing. It appears in the Shouts & Murmurs section, a regular feature in the magazine, billed as humourous fiction.

But not everyone is laughing. It didn't take long for members of the indigenous community to call out Eisenberg and The New Yorker on Twitter, for using the word "squaw."

Here is the magazine's original tweet:

Once the article started to be shared online, the indigenous community began responding.

Some people tried to educate The New Yorkereditors and Eisenberg on the racist term.

While others took it a step further...

... and wondered how The New Yorker would portray other cultures.

Eisenberg, who played Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network, isn't the first Hollywood actor to insult the indigenous community through what could be called inappropriate humour.

Eight native actors and a cultural adviser walked off the set of the Adam Sandler comedyThe Ridiculous Six saying the script was insulting to native women and elders

A Canadian fashion duo also came under fire for using the same racist term Eisenberg used when describing their fall line this past March.

About the Author

Kim Wheeler

Writer

Kim Wheeler is an Anishinabe/Mohawk. She is a writer and an award-winning producer living in Winnipeg. Her work on the CBC radio series ReVision Quest garnered a New York Festival silver medal and two ImagineNative awards. Wheeler currently works as an associate producer for the CBC Aboriginal Digital Unit and Unreserved on CBC Radio One.

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