Artificial trans fat will finally be off our plates, Heart & Stroke says, nearly 12 years after the move was recommended to the federal government.

Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor announced Friday the final step to ban partially hydrogenated oils in all foods sold in Canada.

The oils are the main source of trans fats in foods that raise levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol and lower "good" cholesterol, which can take a toll on our heart health.

Trans fats are used in the production of pastries, other baked goods and some packaged goods to extend shelf life. 

Eliminating the main source of industrially produced trans fat from the food supply will help to protect the health of Canadians, Petitpas Taylor said in a statement.

Canadian researchers estimate a ban could prevent 12,000 heart attacks in Canada over 20 years.

The ban will come into force one year from today on Sept. 15, 2018, to give the food industry enough time to find suitable alternatives, the regulator said.

It will apply to all foods sold in the country, including imported products and foods prepared and served in restaurants and food service establishments.

Heart & Stroke said it will reduce the number of heart attacks in Canada and save lives.

Heart & Stroke co-chaired a task force with Health Canada in 2006 that first recommended the ban. 

In the U.S., manufacturers must ensure that their food products no longer contain trans fats unless otherwise authorized by June 18, 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration  says.