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The Onion print edition planned for Toronto

The Toronto Star has struck a deal with The Onion to create a print edition of the news parody website, the newspaper announced Tuesday.

Toronto Star makes deal with satirical website

A cover from the U.S. print edition of The Onion. It is to debut in Toronto this fall. (The Onion)

The Toronto Star has struck a deal with The Onion to create a print edition of the news parody website, the newspaper announced Tuesday.

The Onion produces print editions in 14 U.S. cities, but the Toronto version will be its first in Canada.

The Star, Canada's largest daily newspaper, says it will begin publishing a print version of The Onion and its pop culture sister title, A.V. Club, this fall.

They will be distributed once a week, but separately from the main daily newspaper.

The Star will manage advertising and distribution, while Toronto-specific content will be created by a local editor, according to a spokesman for the newspaper. The content might include reviews and interviews about music, comedy and the arts, as well as a calendar of coming events.

Toronto Star publisher John Cruickshank says the satirical publication works well with the daily paper's other lines of business, which include the alternative paper The Grid (formerly Eye Weekly).

Steve Hannah, president of Onion Inc., says Toronto is consistently a top-10 city for the satirical publication's online audience.

The Onion website currently features fictional stories such as "Bob Marley Rises From Grave To Free Frat Boys From Bonds Of Oppression" and "Fully Validated Kanye West Retires To Quiet Farm In Iowa."

The Onion started in 1988 as a weekly newspaper at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and became a popular website with 10 million readers a month. About two million readers access its print editions in New York, Washington, D.C., Chicago, Denver/Boulder, Philadelphia and Madison, Wisconsin.

The Onion brand also includes Peabody-winning web-video series (including Onion News Network and SportsDome) that inspired television spin-offsbroadcast on the U.S.-based Independent Film Channel and SuperChannel in Canada.