Facebook signs deal with Warner to use its music

Facebook has signed an agreement with Warner Music Group that allows users to include Warner’s recorded music in messages and posts on Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and Oculus.

When you upload that cover version or wedding video with a favourite song, Facebook pays

Bruno Mars performs in a Prince tribute Feb. 12, 2017, in Los Angeles. If you upload your cover version of Mars's Finesse, or any other of his songs, Facebook will have to pay Warner music. (Matt Sayles/Invision/Associated Press)

Facebook has signed an agreement with Warner Music Group that allows users to include Warner's recorded music in messages and posts on Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and Oculus.

This is the third agreement it has signed to license music rights, after deals with Universal Music Group and Sony/ATV Music Publishing.

The announcement means Facebook will pay Warner when fans post videos with music by its artists, including Ed Sheeran, Bruno Mars and Blue Rodeo. That includes cover versions and wedding dance videos.

Facebook and Messenger users are creating an increasing number of posts using music, which had the music industry demanding that Facebook pay up to compensate artists and licence holders for use of the work.

Fan-created video

"Our partnership with Facebook will help expand the universe of music streaming and create supplementary revenue for artists," said Ole Obermann, chief digital officer at Warner Music Group.

"Fan-created video is one of the most personal, social and often viral ways that music is enjoyed, but its commercial potential is largely untapped."

Terms of the deal have not been released.

As Facebook battles with YouTube for users, music is seen as a way to encourage people to watch and upload videos on its site.

The deal comes the same day as a Facebook agreement with Major League Baseball to air 25 afternoon games.

The games will be available to Facebook users in the U.S. on Facebook Watch, the company's video feature, via the MLB Live show page. Facebook said Friday that recorded broadcasts will also be available globally, excluding select international markets.