Winter weather 2014

One of Canada's leading weather watchers has bad news for anyone hoping to avoid the deep freeze of last winter — you're probably out of luck.

The Weather Network's winter outlook for Canada is calling for conditions that prevailed a year ago to be more or less repeated across the country.

Chief Meteorologist Chris Scott is forecasting colder than average temperatures from eastern Saskatchewan through to New Brunswick.

USA-WEATHER/

One of Canada's leading weather watchers has bad news for anyone hoping to avoid the deep freeze of last winter — you're probably out of luck. (Reuters)

He said the rest of Saskatchewan, Alberta and the other Atlantic provinces should brace for wildly swinging temperatures that average out to near seasonal norms.

"December will be a rollercoaster, with outbreaks of cold air coupled with stretches of milder temperatures," Scott said.

"Our forecast team expects January and February is when winter will really be felt, with more frequent outbreaks of extreme cold."

The 2013-2014 winter weather pattern is expected to repeat in British Columbia and the Territories, which means those regions can expect warmer than normal conditions for the next few months.

Scott says these general trends will take hold starting in January and he expects December will be a time of more erratic temperature swings across the country.

On the bright side, cold weather should not be as prolonged or quite as frigid as last winter.

Here is The Weather Network's breakdown by region:

The Prairies

Most of Alberta and Saskatchewan will experience dramatic swings between mild and cold conditions, averaging out to near normal temperatures. Extreme eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba should expect below normal temperatures.

Most areas are expected to see near normal precipitation, except for the extreme southern part of Alberta which will be below normal.

Ontario and Quebec

Most of Ontario and Quebec should experience below normal temperatures this winter. Southern parts of the provinces will likely be on the edge of an active storm track through the northeast U.S.

While most regions are forecast to be near normal for precipitation, there is the potential for more snow than normal especially if the storm track comes farther north.  

Atlantic Canada

Overall, near normal temperatures are expected for most of the Maritimes and Newfoundland and Labrador. Above normal precipitation is expected across much of the region, which will be impacted by storms coming from the northeast U.S.


The Weather Network's Winter Outlook, 2014-15
Region Temperature Precipitation
B.C. Above normal in most of the southern part of the province. Near normal elsewhere.

Below normal in the southern part of the province. Near normal elsewhere.

Alberta Near normal.

Below normal in the extreme southern part of the province. Near normal elsewhere.

Sask.

Below normal in the extreme eastern part of the province. Near normal elsewhere.

Near normal.
Manitoba

Below normal almost everywhere except the area close to Hudson Bay where near normal temperatures are more likely.

Near normal.

Ontario

Below normal almost everywhere except for areas near Hudson Bay where near normal temperatures are more likely.

Near normal.

Quebec

Below normal almost everywhere except the northern part where near normal temperatures are more likely.

Near normal almost everywhere except above normal across the Lower North Shore, Gaspésie and Eastern Townships.  

Atlantic Canada

Near normal across most of the region except northern New Brunswick which is expected to be below normal.

Near normal across Nova Scotia and eastern Newfoundland. Above normal through New Brunswick, P.E.I., western Newfoundland and most of Labrador.

Yukon, N.W.T., Nunavut

Generally near normal except for southeastern N.W.T. and southwestern Nunavut.

Below normal in the southwestern part of Yukon. Near normal elsewhere.

With files from The Weather Network