Young Ontarians a key part of the Brotherhood of the Guitar

A prominent photographer who has worked with some of the biggest names in rock 'n' roll is doing his best to help shine a light on a new generation of musicians, including some talented guitarists from Ontario.
Christian Vegh is among the young talents who have been entered into the Brotherhood of the Guitar. (Nick Boisvert/CBC)

A prominent photographer who has worked with some of the biggest names in rock 'n' roll is doing his best to help shine a light on a new generation of musicians, including some talented guitarists from Ontario.

Robert M. Knight has taken photos of many top artists during his decades-long career, including the late Jimi Hendrix, Elton John, Led Zeppelin and many others.

A few years ago, Knight was the subject of a documentary called Rock Prophecies.

The director of that film asked Knight if he was able to scout young musicians, as he did when he was younger.

That became part of the documentary and it spurred an idea in Knight's mind, in which he would travel and attempt to find the next wave of guitar players.

"After the movie came out, I started being inundated by young artists from around the world asking me to help them," Knight told CBC Radio's Afternoon Drive in a recent interview.

That led to the creation of the Brotherhood of the Guitar, an effort to promote young guitarists so that more people can learn about their talents and their music.

"It just really started to take off," Knight said.

A handful of young musicians from Ontario are now part of the Brotherhood of the Guitar, including Windsor's Christian Vegh.

"Christian Vegh came on my radar via his mother, who emailed me when she heard about the Brotherhood," said Knight.

"He is an amazing guitar player in that he plays a seven-string guitar which requires a huge amount of dexterity and ability of a player," said Knight.

Other young Ontarians that have caught Knight's eye and been entered into the Brotherhood include Barrie's Lyric Dubee and Sudbury's Steve Costello.

Knight said the key element in the Brotherhood is the talent that lies in its musicians.

"It's based on their chops, their ability to play the guitar," he said.

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