When the answers are revealed on the big screen, some of the seventh graders roar in disappointment, while others pump their fists victoriously in the air.

A new interactive game called Kahoot has changed the way one classroom in Windsor operates.

Seventh-grade teacher Paola DiMenna-Aiello has been using the game to help teach French at Talbot Trail Public School.

"The kids are used to having technology and I wanted to find a way to incorporate it into my class," she said. "Instead of them being face down in their technology, I wanted them to start looking up and interacting with others."

Talbot Trail Public School

Students at Talbot Trail Public School are learning French with the help of an interactive game called Kahoot. (Stacey Janzer/CBC)

The program is free and students can use their own devices to play along or use one of the school's iPads.

During a 50-minute class Thursday the students went through three exercises, including one about Windsor's French culture.

"I wanted them to have culture, but I also wanted it to be culture that is in their everyday life, so they can see it's not just in Quebec, it's not just in France, actually there's French around here," said DiMenna-Aiello.

She said Kahoot really sped up the teaching process, allowing her to move the students through units quickly.

The students agree the entertaining game has helped them learn more French.

Trina Das said no one looked forward to French class before Kahoot like they do now. She said it's a great way to learn.

"It doesn't feel like you're working, it just feels like you're playing a game but studying at the same time," said Das.

Check out the students in action:

Talbot Trail Public School

Seventh-grade students at Talbot Trail Public School are using a new interactive game to make learning French easy and fun. (Stacey Janzer/CBC)

Talbot Trail Public School

Questions in French are displayed on the interactive whiteboard while the students use their electronic devices to answer. (Stacey Janzer/CBC)

Talbot Trail Public School

The quicker the response time, the more points each student earns. (Stacey Janzer/CBC)