An incredible ability to chug and burp on the run is the secret behind Corey Bellemore's success — that and the fact he's fast, really fast.

The 22-year-old recently broke his own world record in the Beer Mile, an international event that marries two unlikely activities: running and drinking.

"The biggest thing that sets me apart is my ability to hold down the alcohol and not have the urge to puke," Bellemore explained. "You have to be able to chug it down, open your throat and keep the laps fast in between."

He's not joking, the Windsor-native clocked a blistering 4:33.6 during a race in San Francisco, blowing away the previous world record of 4:35.35, which he set in the U.K. the year before.

That means Bellemore somehow managed to run a four-minute mile (1.6 km) with about 30 seconds left to down four bottles of beer.

"I treat it as more of a fun thing to do, but once I'm in the race I'm definitely competitive," he said.

To complete the mile, racers start by chugging a beer while walking the first ten metres of the track before running a lap. Then they repeat the process four more times.

Anyone who throws up has to complete a penalty lap.

Corey Bellemore

Corey Bellemore, 22, holds the world record in the Beer Mile, a competition combining running and drinking. (Chris Ensing/CBC)

The origins of the Beer Mile are a little blurry, but Bellemore said it may have started with runners at Queen's University in the 1980s. In recent years the underground tradition has become a full-blown international sensation with runners from around the world slugging back brews and sprinting for a chance at the title.

Runners celebrate race with a cold beer

Bellemore recently graduated from the University of Windsor, where he ran for the Lancers and has competed across the world in races, including the World University Games and Francophone Games.

But he's arguably best known for the Beer Mile, a reputation that follows him even when he's introduced at the starting line for alcohol-free events.

"If I'm nervous before a race it definitely lightens my nerves. I laugh and my competitors laugh too," he joked.

After the race, Bellemore said the athletes all cool down together then sit back to celebrate with, you guessed it, a nice cold beer.

Even then, it doesn't take a starter's gun to kickoff an impromptu competition.

"Since everyone can pretty much chug it usually involves some chug offs."