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The issue of the mysterious rumble bothering people in parts of Windsor-Essex may never be resolved because River Rouge, Mich., will no longer search for its origin. (CBC)

The issue of the mysterious rumble bothering people in parts of Windsor-Essex may never be resolved.

Government officials and a consultant hired by the City of River Rouge, Mich., know the rumbles and vibrations are an airborne sound wave originating from the general vicinity of Zug Island,

However, the city of River Rouge does not want to spend any more money to continue an investigation to track down the exact origin of the sound.

That does not sit well with Windsor city councillor Al Maghnieh. He is furious.

He says the noise and vibrations are quality of life issues and thinks the new setback demands another public meeting to discuss what to do next.

"The next step is to gather residents and to rally up all the folks who are being affected by this again, have another public meeting to sit down and map out our strategy, with respect to reaching out to our senior levels of government, the federal and provincial governments," Maghnieh said. "This is now a cross-border affair at a much higher level."

The provincial Ministry of Environment has received about 400 complaints about the noise since March.

Maghnieh has led the campaign to find the source of the annoying vibrations.

During the summer, Maghnieh toured the Zug Island area with the mayor of River Rouge. They heard an airborne sound wave coming from a steel mill.     

The consultant hired by River Rouge wrote Maghnieh and told the councillor the city he works for has no more money for the search to continue.

"We find that quite shocking, very disappointing. Really, it's out of left field," Maghnieh said. "Unfortunately, this latest information saying that they can't fund any further investigation is a complete blow."

Maghnieh plans to hold another public meeting, like the one held in September.

With files from Gino Conte