Demonstrators camping out in a downtown Windsor park can apparently settle in for the winter

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It's clear Windsor's mayor and chief or police have no no intention of asking the Occupy Windsor group to leave Senator David Croll Park.

It's clear Windsor's mayor and chief of police have no intention of asking the Occupy Windsor group to leave Senator David Croll Park.

Mayor Eddie Francis says taking action against a small group of peaceful protestors can lead to bigger problems. He says the last thing he wants to do is stir the pot.

'To do anything, I think, would have more consequences than benefits.'— Windsor Mayor Eddie Francis

"Right about now, to move in to do anything, I think, would have more consequences than benefits," Francis said.

Most city officials fear that if they intervene in the Occupy movement, it could result in a negative image for the community.

Peaceful protest

Police chief Gary Smith says his officers monitor the Occupy Windsor camp daily.

For the most part, the protestors have been well behaved and cooperative, he said.

The chief tells CBC News there has been no formal complaint filed about the protest. Not even from Councillor Drew Dilkens, who wants the protesters to comply with bylaws and apply for a permit to camp overnight.

'It's a parks bylaw and we're not talking about criminal code offences.'— Windsor Police Chief Gary Smith

"It's a parks bylaw and we're not talking about criminal code offences," Smith said. "We're not talking about drug offences."

"Although he's mentioned it, I haven't had a call nor did he call me."

Dilkens said a constituent complained to him about drug use at the park.

"I can't speak for the other agencies that check on safety and that, but nothing's been reported to us that's raised any concerns at this point," Smith said.

The protestors have now been in the park for 39 days.

Police and councils elsewhere in Canada have broken up and taken down camps.

Francis says he's more concerned about finalizing investment deals to create new jobs than worry about a peaceful demonstration in a park.

"We didn't want to do anything that painted Windsor in a negative light or do anything to stir the pot that gave rise to someone or some group or something to create a negative image for the city," Francis said.