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Douglas Rosete and his lawyer Bruck Easton, seen above, are fighting to keep Rosete's licence to operate La Maison Royale lodging home, after the city shut down the site last month. (Sean Henry/CBC News)

The City of Windsor's licensing committee has granted La Maison Royale lodging house a last chance.

Report: La Maison Royale problems

  • Inadequate staffing.
  • Missing signatures.
  • Inadequate food supply.
  • A drug overdose.
  • Broken windows.
  • Bed bugs.
  • Slip-and-fall injury unreported.
  • Unsafe distribution of medicine.l

The city initially recommended the home's licence be revoked but relented Tuesday after a lengthy hearing at Windsor City Hall.

The city suspended La Maison Royale's licence last month because it said it had "serious concerns" about the health and safety of its residents. The move forced 11 residents to abruptly move out of the assisted living home.

The committee now recommends the licence be reinstated but with conditions, including random inspections. Any infractions would lead to the immediate suspension of the licence and another hearing.

Valerie Critchley, the city's licensing commissioner, said city compliance and enforcement officials were at the hearing and know what the conditions are. So they will look to ensure they are being met.

A 96-page report presented at a licensing committee hearing Tuesday showed the city had been keeping tabs on the house since 2008. The report cited in chronological order a lengthy list of problems that began three years ago.

The city renewed the home's licence Oct. 17, 2011. It suspended the licence about 10 days later and not long after an alleged drug overdose happened at the home.

Staff blamed an inexperienced 18-year-old nursing student for the overdose. Staff said she failed to record a previous dosage and the person was then given another too soon.

The home's owner, Grace Rosete-Lasala, said there is no way she and her staff would put residents in danger. She called it a mistake that won't happen again.

"My own grandmother lives in 1016 Pelissier, La Maison Royale. She lived and ate with the residents there, and was being called grandma as well," she said.

"I certainly would be one not to look favourably if we had to deal with this owner again for what one would consider a trivial issue or a more serious issue," councillor Drew Dilkens said.

It's not yet known when, or even whether, the 11 residents forced out can return to the home.

READ: Maison Royale Licencing Committee Report Pt. 1

READ: Maison Royale Licencing Committee Report Pt. 2