Detroit free toilet program means less sewage overflow into lakes

Detroit Water & Sewerage Department Director Gary Brown said less water running through Detroit household pipes and toilets means less sewage overflows contaminating Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River.

City's Water Residential Assistance Program helps low-income residents pay water bills

Less water in Detroit pipes means less sewage overflow into lakes and waterways. (Cal Tobin/CBC)

Detroit, Mich. residents are seeing their water bills drop as part of a city program that installs new toilets for free and covers plumbing repairs.

The Detroit Free Press reports that Susan Kulczyk had an ultra-low-flow toilet installed in her Detroit home last month. She's part of the city's Water Residential Assistance Program that helps low-income residents pay water bills for up to two years.

Kulcyzk's water bills have dropped from more than $200 a month to less than $70.

The program follows service shut-offs and protests after thousands of Detroit residents were behind on their water bills or weren't paying them at all.

Detroit Water & Sewerage Department Director Gary Brown said less water running through Detroit household pipes and toilets means less sewage overflows contaminating Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River.

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