Video

Striking U of T workers set up more picket lines

Striking University of Toronto teaching assistants set up picket lines again on Tuesday morning, after union representatives blasted the latest offer from the university as being worse than previous deals.

CUPE Local 3902 workers hold 'Day of Action' at U of T's Mississauga campus

CUPE Local 3902 members hold 'day of action' at university's Mississauga campus 1:49

Striking University of Toronto teaching assistants set up picket lines again on Tuesday morning, after union representatives blasted the latest offer from the university as being worse than previous deals.

Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 3902, which represents some 6,000 teaching assistants and other non-tenured staff, have been on strike for two weeks.  

Classes haven’t been cancelled at U of T’s three campuses and the university says exams will go ahead as planned, but the latest breakdown points to a lengthy disruption.

Craig Smith, one of dozens of 3902 workers who joined a picket line at the University of Toronto’s Mississauga campus early Tuesday morning, said the university has left them no choice but to intensify their picket lines.

Tuesday morning’s picket line has already started backing up traffic on Mississauga Road. Peel Regional Police suggest drivers look for alternate routes to avoid the area of Mississauga Rd. between Burnhamthorpe and Dundas.

While students reported most of their classes are going ahead as normal, many said they wish the labour disruption would end.

For more on what’s driving the U of T strike, plus an update on the York University strike, check out the CBC’s Neil Herland’s report in the video above.

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