Cease and desist letters were given to several vendors at the Canadian National Exhibition this weekend to stop the selling of counterfeit goods.

It’s a problem that has plagued ‘The Ex’ before. Last year police seized nearly $1 million worth of counterfeit goods and laid charges.

The CNE said that those charged vendors were not allowed back this year.

But over the weekend notices showed that the problem has reared its head again.

Lorne Lipkus, a lawyer representing several brands, said that private investigators served civil cease and desists letters to several CNE booths, adding that his clients are concerned about the safety issues and reputations of their brand.

The Consumers' Association of Canada said shoppers need look closely at what they're buying and be realistic about what might be too good to be true.

“You can buy a pair of these fake sunglasses and think you're getting some protection from some UV's and all the rest of it, and all you've got is a piece of colour plastic in there,” said Bruce Cran, president of Consumers Association of Canada.

In a statement today, the CNE said that “a retail review committee requires every vendor to submit a full list of products intended for sale; “and that CNE officials are working in full cooperation with investigators to monitor and enforce the anti-counterfeit policy as best best they can.