Toronto is dealing with more than double the amount of potholes this season than last year at this time. It's not only dangerous for drivers, but costly too.

The recent cold snap followed by thawing temperatures has caused parts of roads to crumble.

"We've fixed close to 50 per cent more [potholes] than we did last year," said Hector Moreno, manager at the city's road operations. "We're up to 4,000 potholes year-to-date compared to 1,500 last year."

To keep up, the City of Toronto has more than doubled the number of crews out on the roads.

Jody Pearson, who works as part of a road crew, says he's been fixing about 25 potholes a day — which means carrying an average of four tonnes of asphalt every day.

The potholes are costing the city extra money to fix — an amount that will be tallied at the end of the season — but it will also cost drivers. "The wheels get flat tires and it wrecks the suspension of the car," says Pearson of particularly bad potholes.

Rims, one mechanic said, can cost upwards of $1,200 to fix.

Crews are working to fix the on-road problems as fast as they can. The public can report potholes by calling 311, or by using a 311 app that can be downloaded onto your phone to report potholes.

Once reported, the city says it usually takes about three to five weeks to fix

If your car has been damaged by a pothole, you can submit a claim letter. It can be done via e-mail, mail, fax or by filling out the form here. You'll need to include the following information if seeking a claim:

  • Your name, home address, phone number and e-mail address.
  • The date, time and location of accident which caused the property damage or injury.
  • A diagram and/or photo of where it happened.
  • A description about how the accident happened and the names and phone numbers of any witnesses.
  • Detailed description of your property damage or injury.
  • Include documentation that you believe support your claim, including photos, receipts and estimates.
  • An outline why you believe the city is responsible.

With a report from the CBC's Natalie Kalata