Planning Frosh Week hijinks? It could cost you

York Regional Police have released a tongue-in-cheek list of ways in which not-quite-legal Frosh Week revelry can render the first month of school even more expensive.

Police in York Region aim to promote safety, laughs with Frosh Week expense list

Buying alcohol for someone who's underage — even if it's just for the purposes of playing beer pong — is illegal, and can lead to a fine of up to $500.

It's a pricey time of year for students entering college and university.

And police in York Region have released a tongue-in-cheek list of ways in which not-quite-legal Frosh Week revelry can render the first month of school even more expensive. 

York Regional Police posted their "Frosh Week Expense List" to Twitter on Thursday. The graphic lists a litany of offences and outlines what fines or other consequences students may incur if they break the rules.

Underage drinking, of course, made the list. If officers in Ontario find a student under 19 who's under the influence of alcohol, they can issue the offender a $125 fine. 

And if you're caught streaking on campus after midnight (or any other time), you can expect a fine of between $100 and $5,000. (That's a lot of cash for a little fresh air.) 

Some of the entries are much stranger, suggesting police have seen it all during Frosh Week over the years. 

Drinking alcohol "in the back of your friend's Corolla?" Expect a $215 ticket.  

Forcing your pet to smoke marijuana? That comes with a fine of up to $5,000, jail time or both. 

And if you're wondering how much you could get dinged if you "drop excessive bass at 4 a.m."

It "depends on how excessive,"  the expense list informs us ever so helpfully. 

Joking aside, police say the list is about encouraging student safety on and off campus. 

"These are a few activities considered to be college rituals," the image reads. "Just remember, they may end up costing you your grocery money. Party with caution."

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