As Canadians pursued gold in Sochi on Monday their fans back home in Ontario were busy cheering them on in large community gatherings.

Ice-dancing pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir's performance drew a large crowd at the Ilderton, Ont., community centre — located outside London, Ont., — where the pair began dancing together at the age of 10 and seven.

The defending champions set a new free dance world record for their routine, but it was smashed only a few minutes later when Meryl Davis and Charlie White of the U.S. countered with a world record of their own to capture the gold medal.

That result meant the 2010 champs had to settle for silver in their last Olympic performance together, but it didn't change the way friends and family in Ilderton felt about the pair.

"They're golden to us no matter what," organizer Nancy Manning told CBC News.

Moir's 86-year-old grandfather Matt MacCormack said: "I'm very proud, what they've accomplished has been great."

CBC reporter Shannon Martin said the gathering fell silent during Virtue and Moir's skate.

"Everyone sat on the edge of their seat during the performance then a roaring standing ovation one they'd finished," she said.

"Everyone here says their legacy will live on in the young skaters they've inspired in their hometown and you can bet  they're planning one big welcome home party for Tessa and Scott," reported Martin.

A similar gathering was going on in Milton, Ont., where friends, fans and family of freestyle skiing aerialist Travis Gerrits watched his performance together at the Milton Sports Centre.

The crowd stood on their feet during Gerrits's jumps. The CBC's Steven D'Souza captured their reaction in this Vine video.

Fans also signed a massive Sochi 2014 banner to honour Gerrits, who ended up finishing seventh in the event.