Olivia Chow launches NDP bid in Spadina-Fort York

Olivia Chow is announcing this morning she will run for the NDP in the upcoming federal election in the same general downtown Toronto area she represented for years, although her former riding now has a new name and different boundaries.

Former MP and Toronto mayoral candidate returning to federal politics

Olivia Chow, who resigned her federal seat in 2014 to run for mayor in Toronto, will run in this fall's federal election. (Michelle Siu/Canadian Press)

Olivia Chow announced this morning she will run for the NDP in the upcoming federal election in the same general downtown Toronto area she represented for years, although her former riding now has a new name and different boundaries.

Chow, the widow of former NDP leader Jack Layton, resigned her seat in Parliament in 2014 to run in Toronto's mayoral election, which she lost to John Tory. Now, she'll face off with former city councillor Adam Vaughan, who captured the Trinity–Spadina riding for the Liberal party last summer.

That riding, which Chow represented for eight years, was redistributed and renamed Spadina—Fort York in the redrawing of Canada's electoral boundaries last year that will see the addition of 30 ridings in this election.

SpadinaFort York encompasses much of the downtown core as well as the city's waterfront, a space that's seen a tremendous condo boom.

NDP Leader Tom Mulcair spoke first at Chow's announcement Tuesday. Layton's children, Sarah and Mike Layton, were also present. Mike Layton is a Toronto city councillor.

Chow, who is also a former Toronto councillor and school trustee, is currently serving as a distinguished visiting professor with Ryerson University's Faculty of Arts, where her work focuses on community engagement and democratic participation.

In the 2014 mayoral election, Chow won 226,879 votes — or 23 per cent of the overall vote — to finish third behind Tory and Doug Ford, the brother of former mayor Rob Ford. 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.