Remains of Andrew Kinsman found on property where Bruce McArthur worked

Toronto police say the remains of at least six people, including those of Andrew Kinsman, have been found on a property where alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur worked and stored his landscaping equipment.

'It is getting bigger, and we are getting more resources,' says lead detective of investigation

The remains of Andrew Kinsman were found among those of six people at a Leaside property where alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur worked and kept equipment. (Toronto Police Service)

Police say they have found the remains of at least six people, including those of Andrew Kinsman, who went missing in June 2017, on a property where alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur worked and stored landscaping equipment.

McArthur, 66, is charged with five counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of five men: Majeed Kayhan, Soroush Mahmudi, Dean Lisowick, Andrew Kinsman, and Selim Esen. 

"I do anticipate more charges being laid," said Det-Sgt. Hank Idsinga on Thursday. 

Police say the remains of six people, including those of Andrew Kinsman who went missing in June 2017, have been found on a property where alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur stored landscaping equipment. 11:51

Human remains belonging to at least three people had already been found hidden in large planters on the property, located on Mallory Crescent. On Thursday, police confirmed that the remains of three more people had also been found in planters.

Other than Kinsman, the remains have not yet been identified.

'It is getting bigger' 

Idsinga said that with the discovery of three more sets of remains, the investigation into McArthur continues to grow in scope. 

"It is getting bigger, and we are getting more resources," he said. 

In addition to working to identify the five sets of remains found so far in planters on Mallory Crescent, police are set to begin excavating the yard. 

Using ground penetrating radar and canine units, police identified an area of the yard where the earth had been disturbed and set to thawing the frozen ground using a tent and large heaters.

A blue tent in Fraser's yard covers the area where police have been using heaters to thaw the frozen ground before starting to dig. (CBC)

"It depends on the weather and how far we have to dig," said Idsinga of the excavation, estimating it could take more than a week to complete. 

The forensic pathologists office has also been going through 15 or so planters taken from properties around Toronto where McArthur worked as a landscaper — though Idsinga noted they have yet to find any evidence from a location other than Mallory Crescent. 

He also revealed on Thursday that police are eyeing a second site for excavation, and that how police proceed "might depend on what we find at this site."

The investigation also has an extensive digital component, Idsinga added , saying that police are going through computers, cellphones, and apps.

Delving into McArthur's past

Idsinga said the first priority for police is to focus on "what we have already," referring to the evidence found so far. "Then we'll start working back through some missing person occurrences." 

He said they plan to dig back "quite far" into hundreds of missing persons cases to see if McArthur could be connected, and confirmed that they will be looking at McArthur's past.

Bruce McArthur, 66, moved to Toronto around the year 2000. Police say they plan on investigating his past. (Bruce McArthur/Facebook)

The 66-year-old grew up in the Kawartha Lakes region and later lived in Oshawa. He is believed to have moved to Toronto around 2000. 

Idsinga also said Toronto police are working with other police forces, but declined to name which ones.