Ex-Oshawa councillor handed 8 years, 4 months for kidnapping, standoff

A former Oshawa city councillor charged with abducting a lawyer at gunpoint in 2012 and prompting a day-long standoff with police was handed an eight year and four month sentence on Friday.

Robert Lutczyk to receive 60-month credit for time served, leaving 3 years and 4 months to serve

Former Oshawa city councillor Robert Lutczyk was handed a sentence of eight years and four months in connection with a 2012 kidnapping and police standoff in Whitby, Ont. (Photo courtesy Oshawa This Week)

A former Oshawa city councillor charged with abducting a lawyer at gunpoint in 2012 and prompting a day-long standoff with police was handed a prison sentence of eight years four months on Friday.

Robert Lutczyk will receive a 60-month credit for time served, meaning he actually has serve three years and four months left to serve.

Lutczyk's defence lawyer Chris Murphy told CBC News the judge nearly imposed a 10-year total sentence when the defence called a recess, arguing that length of time was not discussed in the pretrial. Following the recess, the Crown and defence returned with a joint submission for the final sentence.

In 2012, Lutczyk was charged with the abduction of city solicitor David Potts from the lawyer's home in Clarington after an Oshawa city council meeting.

Potts's wife said then that she saw her husband's car in the driveway on the night of his kidnapping and phoned police when he didn't come inside.

Police eventually located Lutczk's vehicle in an industrial area repair shop in Whitby, where Potts, still handcuffed, managed to escape.

Lutzcyk then fled into the garage, barricading himself inside for nearly 30 hours.

Police would not say specifically what prompted the dispute between Lutczyk and Potts.

The former city councillor's charges included kidnapping using a restricted firearm, uttering threats to cause bodily harm, forcible confinement, flight from police, dangerous operation of a motor vehicle, and use of a firearm in committing an offence.

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