A bill named in honour of a gas station attendant who died trying to stop a gas-and-dash theft is one of the casualties of Premier Dalton McGuinty’s move to prorogue the Ontario legislature.

Growing anger over the prorogation decision is focusing on Jayesh’s Law, which died on the order paper along with other legislation last week when McGuinty announced he was stepping down and ending the legislative session.

The bill is named after station attendant Jayesh Prajapati, 44, who died in September while trying to stop a gas-and-dash theft at a Toronto gas station.

He was struck and dragged by an SUV driven by a male suspect who had filled up with $112 worth of fuel then fled without paying. Police have yet to track down the driver.

Days after Prajapati’s death, members of his family went to Queen’s Park and argued for a law in his name that would force drivers to pay before pumping to avoid violent confrontations between gas thieves and station attendants.

"Jayesh was a hardworking family man who was so proud when he became a Canadian citizen and he loved Canada," his sister Vipa Prajapati told CBC last month. "I hope that there is some good that can come out of Jayesh's death."

Prorogation now puts Jayesh’s law on hold. Progressive Conservative MPPs have scheduled a Tuesday morning news conference where they are expected to demand McGuinty reverse his decision to prorogue.

Delay of Jayesh's law 'a setback' Liberal MPP says

Liberal MPP Mike Colle introduced Jayesh's Law and says it will be re-introduced at the next sitting of the legislature.

"It is a setback, but a minor one," he told CBC News. "When the legislature resumes, I'll reintroduce it again and begin giving it more profile."

But a timeline to re-start Jayesh's Law is still unclear. The legislature will only be recalled after the Liberals choose a new leader.

With files from Genevieve Tomney