He may be standing in RoboCop's shadow at the moment, but Toronto’s John Paul Ruttan is looking to find his place in the limelight.

"I think I dream about getting an Oscar — probably more than one Oscar, probably for either director or actor," Ruttan told CBC News in a recent interview. "Maybe I can do both, I don’t know."

The soon-to-be 13-year-old actor has a role in the new RoboCop remake, playing the son of the title character.

"It’s the biggest role I’ve ever done," said Ruttan, who already has a growing number of TV and film appearances under his belt.

The original RoboCop movie was released in 1987. It spawned two big-screen sequels, a cartoon, a live-action TV show and a line of toys.

Fast-forward to the present and RoboCop has been given a big-budget reboot. Variety.com has reported that the film had a $120-million production budget.

This time around, the man-and-machine police officer will be played by Joel Kinnaman, who some will recognize from AMC’s detective series, The Killing.

On Monday, Ruttan is attending the red-carpet premiere for RoboCop in Los Angeles, an event for which he was fitted for a new suit. He picked out a new tie and a flashy pair of argyle socks to go with it.

While Ruttan has been down a red carpet before, he admitted to being both nervous and excited about the upcoming event.

Ruttan said he got interested in movies by watching some "classics," including favourites The Goonies and Stand By Me.

"One day, I kind of had this passion and I wanted to be that person on TV, and all these movies had kids starring in them," he said.

He got an audition with an agent when he was six and he was soon on his way.

Looking ahead to the future, Ruttan said he hopes to stick in the film business, whether as an actor, director, a combination of those two, or as an editor.

"Overall, I just want to be a good director that makes lots of money or a good actor that makes lots of money," he said.

His mother, Kathy Pask-Ruttan, said that his family wants him to stay grounded and to live a normal life.

"It’s just what he does and it just happens to be [that] it’s not hockey, it’s acting," she said.

With a report from the CBC's Lorenda Reddekopp