Video

HERstory in Black: Emily Agard

In honour of Black History month, CBC brings you stories from HERstory in Black, a Toronto-based digital photo series profiling 150 black women from the GTA and other parts of Ontario by How She Hustles, a network of 5,000 diverse women.

Agard is the Director of Science, Outreach at Ryerson University

Emily Agard is the Director of Science, Outreach at Ryerson University. (Leilah Dhore)

In honour of Black History month, CBC brings you stories from HERstory in Black, a Toronto-based digital photo series profiling 150 black women from the GTA and other parts of Ontario by How She Hustles, a network of 5,000 diverse women.

INTERACTIVE: Meet 150 black women who have made a place in Canadian history

HERstory in Black: Camille Mitchell

​HERstory in Black: d'bi young anitafrika

​HERstory in Black: Krissy Doyle-Thomas​

HERstory in Black: Akua Delfish and Onika Powell

On Feb. 27, the 150 women featured in HERstory in Black will be celebrated at an event taking place at the Canadian Broadcasting Centre. Some of the women featured in the photo series, including award-winning singer Jully Black will take your questions live on CBC Toronto's Facebook page starting at 6:00 p.m.

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Name: Emily Agard 

What she does: Director of Science, Outreach at Ryerson University

Emily Agard is the Director, Science Communication, Outreach and Public Engagement at Ryerson University. 3:25

Why do you want to make science more accessible to students? 

Emily Agard: When I look around, there are certain populations not represented in science, black youth. A lot of girls have been told that they can't do science, particularly some of the sciences like computer science or physics. In the past, when I have gone to different schools I have talked to students and when I ask them what they are interested in a lot of them don't say science. Even though they are doing well, they're not afraid of science, but they don't see science as an option for them. That's why I'm really motivated to let students see themselves as possibly in a science career. 

Emily Agard is among 150 black women from the GTA featured in a digital photo series called HERstory in Black. (Ebti Nabag)