A woman plummeted to her death while skydiving north of Toronto this weekend, in an apparent accident that is now being investigated by a coroner.

The accident happened around 8 p.m. ET Saturday near Baldwin Airport, according to York Regional Police.

It appears the woman suffered catastrophic equipment failure, police say.

The victim, described as an experienced skydiver, was with the Parachute School of Toronto, Staff Sgt. Alice Tsang told CBC News. The school is based at Baldwin Airport, south of Lake Simcoe on Highway 48.

Parachute School of Toronto

The Parachute School of Toronto typically sees its clients make about 10,000 jumps in a given year. (CBC)

Police are assisting the coroner in the investigation.

Adam Mabee, the school's president, said the 29-year-old woman was a licensed jumper who had been skydiving for seven years.

Mabee said that the woman exited the plane at an altitude of 1,700 metres. Three others had gone out of the plane ahead of her.

"The plane took off with five jumpers on board and three jumpers got out earlier than the last two," he said.

The school could not release the victim's name as police are still getting in touch with her family, Mabee said.

Skydiving fatalities happen on average two to three times a year across Canada, according to Mabee, who has been teaching skydiving for 22 years.

Adam Mabee

Adam Mabee, the president of the Parachute School of Toronto, told CBC News that the woman who died in a skydiving accident on Saturday was 29 years old. (CBC)

"It's not especially frequent, but it does happen," Mabee told CBC News.

Mabee said that in recent years, the school has typically seen 10,000 jumps take place annually.

The atmosphere at the school is "relatively subdued" after the accident, Mabee said, which happened as the summer skydiving season picks up.

Last year, a man in his 40s was also killed while skydiving in the same area. He was a student at the parachute school.

Police said the man was conscious when he hit the ground and was talking to first responders before he began to fade in and out of consciousness. It appeared the victim's parachute didn't deploy, police said.

With files from the CBC's Natalie Kalata