Female cyclist dies after being hit by a truck, police say

A female cyclist has died after being hit by a truck near the intersection of St. George Street and Bloor Street, police said.

City working tirelessly to keep streets safe for pedestrians, cyclists, Mayor John Tory says

A female cyclist has died after being hit by a truck near St. George Street and Bloor Street. (TPS Traffic Operations/Twitter)

A female cyclist has died after being hit by a truck near the intersection of St. George Street and Bloor Street, police said.

The collision happened around 12 p.m. on Tuesday near the busy intersection around the University of Toronto campus. Police released an image of the victim's crumpled black bicycle lying on the pavement.

It's unclear how the fatal collision happened, however there are bike lanes in the area. 

The driver of the truck stayed on the scene, police said.

This is the fourth cyclist to be killed in Toronto this year.

Cyclist who was struck on May 15 has died, police say

Meanwhile, Toronto police say a cyclist who was struck by a car on May 15 has also died.

The 36-year-old man was riding southbound on Colborne Lodge Drive, approaching Lake Shore Boulevard West when the collision occurred.

He was taken to hospital with life-threatening injuries and died on Thursday, June 7.

On Monday, a pedestrian was struck and killed near Dufferin Street and Briar Hill Avenue. Police are still looking for the driver in connection with that case.

City taking steps to keep pedestrians and cyclists safe, mayor says

Mayor John Tory said on Tuesday the deaths have not gone unnoticed.

Delivering a state of the city address at the Toronto Region Board of Trade annual luncheon, Tory said the safety of pedestrians and cyclists is a top priority for him and he is working tirelessly to make the streets safer.

"The safety issue is a huge concern to me. It does keep me awake at nights," he said, adding that this fall, legislative permission will be sought to use traffic wardens to direct traffic at busy intersections.

"You can imagine why it's advantageous, for a number of different reasons, for us to have these people who we can put in place to help manage traffic and to keep pedestrians and cyclists safe, while at the same time keeping things moving."

Tory also pointed to the recently introduced King Street transit pilot, which he said has dramatically improved travel time and reliability.