Hearing for Toronto officer in Distillery District shooting put off until April

A disciplinary hearing for a Toronto police officer who fired multiple bullets into a stopped car during an arrest in the Distillery District last year has been put over until April 19.

Const. Tash Baiati has been charged with insubordination under the Police Services Act

Const. Tosh Baiati was charged after firing several shots into the engine of this car even though it was boxed in during the takedown of a suspect near the Distillery District. The incident happened in September of 2015.

A disciplinary hearing for a Toronto police officer who fired multiple bullets into a stopped car during an arrest in the Distillery District last year has been put over until April 19.

Const. Tash Baiati appeared before a police tribunal on Tuesday. He has been charged with insubordination under the Police Services Act.

"Insubordination is any time an officer violates either a policy or a direct order," said Lawrence Gridin, Baiati's lawyer. "In this case there is a policy in Toronto that says you can't shoot at a vehicle and so the officer is charged with shooting at a vehicle."

Baiati and several other officers staged a takedown of a car and driver at around 1 p.m. near a public park around Parliament and Mill Street on Sept. 16, 2015.

Following a brief pursuit, the car was boxed in when Baiati shot 15 rounds from his service pistol into the vehicle's engine. There were no injuries.

Dozens of witnesses saw the dramatic arrest, including some who captured it on video. Many said they were shocked by the gunfire, especially in such a busy neighbourhood. The suspect who was arrested was charged with multiple offences after the arrest. 

Toronto's mayor says he has questions about the police shooting at a busy intersection. 2:05

Toronto police launched an internal investigation.

Baiati, who served in Afghanistan as a reserve member of the Canadian Forces, remained on duty following the shooting. 

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