Daundre Barnaby, Canadian sprinter, mourned at Mississauga funeral

Some of Canada’s elite runners gathered in Mississauga on Saturday to mourn the loss of one of their own.

Sprinter who competed at London Olympics remembered as funny, selfless

Canadian sprinter remembered at Mississauga funeral 1:58

Some of Canada's elite runners gathered in Mississauga on Saturday to mourn the loss of one of their own.

Daundre Barnaby was 24-years-old when he died last month at a training camp in St. Kitts. Barnaby, who had represented Canada at the 2012 London Olympics in the 400-metre event, had been swimming when he disappeared and was later discovered to have drowned.

On Saturday, Barnaby's family, friends and teammates gathered in Mississauga for his funeral. As his casket was carried into the funeral home, many of the Canadian national team members lined up in their red jackets to pay their respects.

He was really, really funny, always make me laugh, very selfless.- Khamica Bingham, friend and teammate of Daundre Barnaby

"To me he was like a brother," said Khamica Bingham, one of Barnaby's teammates and friends.

"He was really, really funny, always make me laugh, very selfless," Bingham said, adding he was always there for her whenever she needed him.

Barnaby, right, would likely have represented Canada at the Pan Am Games this summer. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)
Barnaby also competed at the 2014 Commonwealth Games and could have represented the country at this summer's TO2015 Pan Am Games.

Athletics Canada CEO Rob Guy said the Pan Am Games will now be even more special for the athletes competing who knew Barnaby.  

"We'll compete thinking of Daundre," he said.

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