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U.S. claims gold in Under-18 Baseball World Cup in Thunder Bay, Ont.

The United States national junior baseball team has earned the title of world champion.

Canada falls in bronze medal game

The United States national junior baseball team celebrates after winning the gold medal at the Under-18 Baseball World Cup on Sunday in Thunder Bay. (Matt Prokopchuk/CBC)
The U-18 Baseball World Cup wrapped up in Thunder Bay yesterday. So how did we do as hosts? Michael Schmidt is the executive director of the World Baseball Softball Confederation 6:21

The United States national junior baseball team has earned the title of world champion.

The U.S. squad claimed the gold medal in the 2017 Under-18 Baseball World Cup on Sunday, beating Korea 8-0 in a packed Port Arthur Stadium in Thunder Bay, Ont.

But that's not all — the win also pushed the United States to an undefeated 9-0 record for the 10-day tournament, which began on September 1.

Japan, meanwhile, took the bronze, beating Canada 8-1.

Round robin rally

It was the end of a long road for Team Canada, one that included an impressive run in the later days of the round robin.

Canada began the tournament with losses in their two opening games. That put the team in a tough position — they had to win every remaining match if they were to make the playoffs and have a chance at the gold medal.

And they did — backs-to-the-wall wins over Italy, Australia and Nicaragua saw Canada earn a spot in the Super Round.

Team Canada and Team Japan shake hands after Japan won the bronze medal in the Under-18 Baseball World Cup on Sunday at Port Arthur Stadium in Thunder Bay. (Matt Prokopchuk/CBC)

But while Canada was able to topple Japan and Cuba in the playoffs, they couldn't beat the U.S. powerhouse, so gold remained out of reach.

In the consolation round, played Saturday at Baseball Central, Nicaragua beat Mexico 10-4, Chinese Taipei defeated South Africa 3-0, and the Netherlands edged Italy 2-1.

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