Thunder Bay police not aware of native women sold on U.S. ships

Thunder Bay police say they are not aware of First Nations women from this city being sold on ships in the U.S.

Native women from Thunder Bay trafficked on ships in U.S., research shows

Thunder Bay police say they are not aware of First Nations women from this city being sold on ships in the U.S., after a recent research shows indigenous women have been trafficked on ships in Duluth. (CBC)

Thunder Bay police say they are not aware of First Nations women from this city being sold on ships in the U.S.

An American researcher recently told CBC that indigenous women from Thunder Bay have been trafficked on ships in Duluth.

Thunder Bay police spokesperson Chris Adams said he could not offer further comment on the issue.

Meanwhile the O.P.P. say they are working with the RCMP and the Canadian Border Services Agency to investigate cross-border crimes, including trafficking. But an OPP spokesperson said they have no specific reports of trafficking or prostitution on ships in Thunder Bay.

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