Thunder Bay long-term care homes respond to inspections

The company operating Hogarth Riverview Manor in Thunder Bay, Ont., says it has improved care for residents in the city's largest long-term care home, after a CBC News story on inspections at the south-side home.

Third party operator responds to concerns at Hogarth Riverview Manor

Officials with Extendicare Assist, which operates Hogarth Riverview Manor in Thunder Bay, Ont., says it has made improvements to resident care since taking over the operations in late 2017. (Jeff Walters / CBC)

The company operating Hogarth Riverview Manor in Thunder Bay, Ont., says it has improved care for residents in the city's largest long-term care home, after a CBC News story on inspections at the south-side home.

"The incidents (as reported) occurred in 2016 and 2017 prior to a management order that led to Extendicare Assist taking over the home," wrote Judy Plummer, the administrator at Hogarth Riverview Manor.

The home is now operated by Extendicare Assist, which took over operations from St. Joseph's Care Group in the fall of 2017.

Plummer said management of the home understood the challenges at the facility, and has since had a "favourable ministry visit", where 13 compliance orders were lifted. She added the company is committed to maintaining that standard, while stabilizing the home, and keeping it in compliance.

'Nobody cares'

One woman who often visited Bethammi Nursing Home said upon hearing about multiple issues at the north-side home, she wanted to point out how employees are often overworked, and short staffed.

Irene Mala, who has a friend who lives at Bethammi, one of the 112-residents in the home.

Mala told CBC she's concerned that one day she will have no choice but to move into long term care, and that concerns her.

She pointed out one resident at Bethammi who was restrained in a bed, and was asking for help for over 30 minutes.

"So she was left like a vegetable when she was really mobile. She likes to walk, and nobody cares. Complete lack of activity, lack of stimuli, and she's left in darkness to just rot."

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