A biologist with the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters says the province's moose herd is healthy overall, even though a neighbouring state in the US is raising concerns about its own moose population.

State officials in Minnesota have classified moose as a species of special concern, as the population there keeps dropping.

A senior wildlife biologist with OFAH said moose in Minnesota are suffering because of climate change and from disease, parasites and a low calf-cow ratio.

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Mark Rykman, a senior wildlife biologist with the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters says the province's moose population is healthy overall. (Supplied)

"Whereas we don't see that combination of ... factors anywhere in Ontario right now," Mark Ryckman said.

Ryckman noted moose are being more tightly managed in areas around Algonquin Park, where some populations are in trouble because of a low rate of reproduction.

Some steps are being taken by Ministry of Natural Resources in Wildlife Management Units near Algonquin Park to help preserve the moose populations resulting from a low cow-calf ratio there, he added.

"[But there are] certainly no concerns that would require intensive management the same way they have in the south," Ryckman said.

"Our moose population in Ontario is healthy for the most part ... There are no concerns that would require intensive management [in northwestern Ontario]."