Premier Kathleen Wynne 'very worried' about Nipigon Bridge

Premier Kathleen Wynne says it's too early to start blaming the contractor for problems with the Nipigon River Bridge in northern Ontario, which failed on Sunday and severed the sole east-west route across the region for a day.

Premier Kathleen Wynne vows province will get to the bottom of what happened, and fix it

Premier Kathleen Wynne visited the CBC Thunder Bay studio on Wednesday, January 13. (Amy Hadley )
From hydro to health care... Kathleen Wynne sit downs to talk with us about the issues. 11:46

Premier Kathleen Wynne says it's too early to start blaming the contractor for problems with the Nipigon River Bridge in northern Ontario, which failed on Sunday and severed the sole east-west route across the region for a day.

Speaking in Thunder Bay, where the Ontario cabinet meets on Thursday, Wynne said people should "take a breath" while engineers try to determine exactly what went wrong with the bridge on the Trans-Canada Highway.

Wynne said the failure of the new infrastructure is cause for concern. 

"We'll get to the bottom of it, and we'll fix it, and then we'll figure out how to make sure it doesn't happen again," she said during an interview with CBC Thunder Bay. "But I'm very worried about it, obviously." 

Wynne said she has yet to witness the damage herself, but she does intend to visit the site at some point.

Wynne also said while she didn't have time to visit the bridge herself, she sent Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca and Northern Development and Mines Minister Michael Gravelle to tour the site on Wednesday and get an update.

One lane of the bridge was reopened to cars and some trucks on Monday, but there has been no estimate as to when the bridge will be fully functional.

About 1,300 trucks cross the bridge in Nipigon, Ont., every day, moving about $100 million worth of goods across Canada daily.

Premier Kathleen Wynne joined Superior Morning host Lisa Laco at the CBC Thunder Bay studio on Wednesday. Wynne said people should "take a breath" while engineers try to determine exactly what went wrong with the bridge on the Trans-Canada Highway. (Amy Hadley )

with files from The Canadian Press

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