Mt. McKay rescue prompts First Nation to discourage climbers

The chief of Fort William First Nation says the community will consider measures to discourage people from climbing Mount McKay.
Mount McKay, which is in Fort William First Nation territory, is closed for most of the winter. (Adam Burns/CBC)

The chief of Fort William First Nation says the community will consider measures to discourage people from climbing Mount McKay.

Georjann Morriseau said the man who was stranded on the side of the mountain for eight hours this past weekend shouldn't have been there in the first place.

She said anyone who wants to use the mountain should notify the First Nation.

Chief Georjann Morriseau says Fort William First Nation may put up "No Trespassing" signs around Mount McKay. (Nicole Ireland/CBC)

"Because then we can at least direct them, and let them know that, ‘you know what? That's not a good idea. You don't want to be doing that at this time of the year and, if you continue, you're doing that at your own risk.'"

Morriseau said the community may put up "No Trespassing" signs around the mountain, to deter people from going there, especially after dark.

She said the entire mountain rests on Fort William First Nation territory, and is typically closed throughout the winter.

"There's a reason for that," said Morriseau. “It is pretty dangerous. It's icy. There's really no need to be up there."

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