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Goat meat demand pushes Thunder Bay farmers

A pair of farmers outside Thunder Bay has been selling spare dairy goats for the dinner table — and they're having trouble keeping up with demand.

Murillo farmers say they have sold 10 extra dairy goats to people who want the meat

Seija Heiskanen and Nathan Epp have been raising dairy goats for about four years, and recently started selling their spare animals for meat. Epp says they can't keep up with demand. (Adam Burns/CBC)

A pair of farmers outside Thunder Bay has been selling their spare dairy goats for the dinner table — and they're having trouble keeping up with demand.

Nathan Epp and Seija Heiskanen run a small farm in Murillo and they started raising dairy goats a few years ago,

"You start out with four goats, and in four or five years you have 30,” Epp said.

They placed a few ads this summer to sell their extra goats for meat and they've already sold 10.

"Right now, I have orders for five more ... so if there any goat producers out there, there are a lot of people looking right now,” he added.

"We have completely sold out of all of our goats. All these ones here, we wanna keep now for next year. And I don't think we're gonna get a chance to try any [goat meat] ourselves this year. It's kind of a shame."

Cindy Salo, co-owner of Bay Meats in Thunder Bay, says she recently had an inquiry about goat meat.

Meeting customer demand

But the co-owner of butcher shop Bay Meats in Thunder Bay said she hasn't had many requests for goat.

"We just had a fellow ask about it a couple of weeks ago, so it's interesting this has just come up,” Cindy Salo said.

Back at the farm, Heiskanen said they're looking to bring in a new type of goat to meet demand.

“It's a meat variety, so we're thinking of going and picking it up and … supplying our customers with what they want,” she said.

A group of American farmers has dubbed this month "Goat-tober" to encourage people to eat more goat.

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