Audio

Dirty Girls Mud Run safety questioned in wake of injuries

After a number of people were injured last weekend at the Dirty Girls Mud Run fundraiser in Murillo, some participants say the course needs to be made safer.
A participant at last weekend's Dirty Girls Mud Run near Thunder Bay says work needs to be done to improve safety on the course. (Matt Goertz/Flickr)
There's a growing move towards "Tough Mudder" style races which combine obstacles and running with a lot of mud and water. 6:42

After a number of people were injured last weekend at the Dirty Girls Mud Run fundraiser in Murillo, some participants say the course needs to be made safer.

Debbie Popien took part in the event, and said it was a lot of fun. But she felt organizers were overwhelmed and some details may have been overlooked.

The one wall was scary.- participant Debbie Popien

"There was no shade. No shade tents, and it was blazing hot,” she said.

“I don't know what the temperature was on Saturday, but it felt like it was 30 C.”

She noted some participants were hurt on a climbing wall, or while running through the muddy course.

"The one wall was scary, the climbing wall, because … there was a three-foot trench below it,” Popien said.

“If you fell, you didn't fall to the ground. You fell in a narrow trench and you kind of bounced against the wall. I think that's where a lot of people got hurt."

Popien said she knows of one person who broke a leg, and another who suffered a fractured wrist and finger.

"There were a lot of little trees, but they left them sticking out a little too much … maybe three or four inches,” Popien continued.

“If you didn't see it, or if it got covered in mud by the other people, you would trip over it."

A spokesperson for the Canadian Cancer Society, the beneficiary of the fundraiser, confirmed to CBC News there were eight injuries at the event in Murillo.

Spokesperson Maria Cabral said there were concerns about the climbing wall.

"So there were some injuries … and we have to thank the first responders for being on task."

Cabral said she hopes the event will be held again next year, but added the Cancer society will “learn from what happened” this year.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.