British Columbia adventurer makes stop in Thunder Bay

An adventurer who hopes to travel around the world without the use of planes, trains or automobiles is in Thunder Bay this week.

Markus Pukonen will not use any kind of motorized vehicle during his journey around the globe

Markus Pukonen won't be sitting in a car, or any other motorized vehicle, during his five-year trip around the globe. (Markus Pukonen/Instagram)
Markus Pukonen has vowed not to set foot in a car, plane, train or motorized boat for the next 5 years. And during that time, he's going to circumnavigate the planet. 6:07
An adventurer who hopes to travel around the world without the use of planes, trains or automobiles is in Thunder Bay this week.

Markus Pukonen is about two months into a five-year journey.

He said he plans to make his way around the globe using any and every type of active transportation he can, including paddling, cycling, swimming, skateboarding and jumping on a pogo-stick.

But Pukonen noted he won't once be sitting in a car, or any other motorized vehicle.

"It's actually... one of my biggest fears of the trip," he said.

"I have a recurring nightmare where I wake up on a vehicle. I can hear the motor running, and I'm like, 'oh no! I'm on a motorized vehicle. Oh no how could this happen'."

An image posted on Markus Pukonen's Instagram account. This is a picture of "a beauty camp beside a beach and hillside full of coconut-sized rocks" on the shores of Lake Superior. (Markus Pukonen/Instagram)

A motor-free journey "definitely makes the trip more challenging, because when I come to a city, and I just want to hop to the other side of the city to go to get some food or meet somebody, I have to figure out a way to get there," he continued.

"Whether it's by bicycle or walking or running, or pogo-sticking, I'll make it work."

Pukonen — founder and leader of the non-profit society Routes of Change — said he hopes his journey will promote the idea of a more sustainable future.

He's raising money for a number of organizations along the way. His goal is to raise $10 million for "leaders of positive change."

Pukonen said he hopes his trip will inspire people to believe that no problem is too big to solve, and that it's just a matter of taking that first step.

"We can change the way we live on this planet, it's just a matter of taking steps toward a sustainable life."

Based in Tofino, B.C., Pukonen began his journey in Toronto, about 70 days ago.

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