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Syrian refugee family arrives in Sudbury after two year journey

A family of Syrian refugees has arrived in Sudbury, after a two year journey to find a new home in Canada. Jinan Dokkak landed at the airport Wednesday afternoon with her mother Noura and young daughter Pamela.

Family of three is sponsored by Sudbury Project Hope

A family of Syrian refugees, sponsored by community organization Sudbury Project Hope, arrived in Sudbury on Thursday. (Sophie Houle-Drapeau/Radio-Canada)
A family of Syrian refugees is looking forward to life in a new home. They just arrived in Sudbury where their new home is now located. The CBC's Robin De Angelis was there as they were greeted at the airport. 6:55

A family of Syrian refugees has arrived in Sudbury, after a two year journey to find a new home in Canada.

Jinan Dokkak landed at the airport Wednesday afternoon with her mother Noura, and young daughter Pamela. The family fled the city of Aleppo five years ago and had been living as refugees in Beirut, Lebanon.

"I am so excited, so happy, to be here finally after two years of hard work," Dokkak said.

"To get to this point, I mean, you feel like your dreams are coming true. To be in a safe place finally, after all the things we have been through."

The family is sponsored by Sudbury Project Hope, a community organization that helps bring refugees to Canada. The organization previously sponsored the Alramadan family in 2016.

Jim Gordon (centre), chair of Sudbury Project Hope, welcomed the Dokkak family at the Sudbury airport. (Sophie Houle-Drapeau/Radio-Canada)

Christian refugees 'don't feel safe'

Chair Jim Gordon said he travelled to Beirut two years ago to meet with refugees from Syria.

Although Sudbury Project Hope is a non-denominational group, Gordon was specifically looking to sponsor a Christian family because of the persecution they face as a religious minority.

"In Lebanon and Beirut, the Christians do not go into the camps. They become urban refugees because they don't feel safe," Gordon said.

"We wanted to find these refugees and to bring them in. I was very fortunate in my case because I was actually able to interview this particular family."

Now that the Dokkak family is in Sudbury, Gordon said they will have some time to rest over the next few days, before volunteers from Sudbury Project Hope begin introducing them to the city.

"We're just delighted...that this is Christmas time, and these people are going to have hope and life again."

About the Author

Robin De Angelis

Reporter/Editor

Robin De Angelis is a multimedia journalist based in Sudbury. Get in touch on Twitter @RobinElizabethD or by email robin.deangelis@cbc.ca