Sudbury students contributing to UN white paper on climate change

A white paper on climate change that will presented to United Nations leaders in December will have input from some students at Sudbury Secondary School.

Science teacher says United Nations input at age 16 will look great on resume

Science teacher Craig Johnstone said being able to contribute to the United Nations at such a young age is a great opportunity for his students. (Jenifer Norwell/CBC)

A white paper on climate change that will presented to United Nations leaders in December will have input from some students at Sudbury Secondary School.

The school is one of six across Canada that has been chosen to contribute to the paper.

Science teacher Craig Johnstone said it's a great opportunity for his students, who he says will have special insight with parents who work in heavy industry.

"The ones I chose to participate in this program were incredibly excited about it, almost very nervous," he said.

"It is an incredible thing to put on a resume that you actually produced a paper that was presented at the UN at 16 years of age."

Grade 11 student Cassidy Barrett is hopeful their voices will be heard. 

"It would be really disappointing knowing that we put that much effort into it and weren't taken seriously," she said.

The students will collaborate with the other five schools via webinar.

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