Randy Carlyle in Sudbury to walk for Lou Gehrig's research

The head coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs hockey team — and a spokesperson for ALS Canada — will be in Sudbury on Saturday to walk for Lou Gehrig's Disease research and awareness.

Coach is shooting to help raise $40,000 in Sudbury, $4M nationally

Randy Carlyle, head coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs, will be in Sudbury on Saturday to walk for ALS research. (Nathan Denette/Canadian Press)

The head coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs hockey team — and a spokesperson for ALS Canada — will be in Sudbury on Saturday to walk for Lou Gehrig's Disease research and awareness. 

Randy Carlyle's brother-in-law John was diagnosed with ALS last September. John, who worked at the Sudbury jail, is now wheelchair-bound.

"The disease is progressing fairly rapidly", said Carlyle. "We see the change, I guess, on a week-to-week basis."

With his sister and brother-in-law in mind, Carlyle approached the ALS society to see what he could do to help. 

Carlyle will walk with his team called "John's Journey" on Saturday. Their goal is to raise $40,000.

But he's also encouraging people across Canada to join one of 90 walks happening around the country in support of ALS research, equipment and education.

The national campaign seeks to raise $40 million.   

The walk in Sudbury on Saturday, June 21 will take place at Delki Dozzi Memorial Park. Registration is at 9 a.m., and the walk starts at 10 a.m.  


FAST FACTS:  

  • "ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease) is a progressive neuromuscular disease in which nerve cells die and leave voluntary muscles paralyzed.
  • Every day two or three Canadians die of the disease."

Source: ALS Canada

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