Audio

Pine St. rooming house not a former hospital, Sudbury historian says

The last walls of the Pine street rooming house in Sudbury are being torn down in the next few days — and one local history buff is hoping to dispel a myth about its origin.
Sudbury will see about 38 parking spaces created on the lot that was once occupied by a rooming house on Pine Street, in Sudbury's downtown. (Marina von Stackelberg/CBC)
The Pine Street rooming house in downtown Sudbury is being torn down. We aired an interview about the history behind the building. 5:11

The last walls of the Pine street rooming house in Sudbury are being torn down in the next few days — and one local history buff is hoping to dispel a myth about its origin.

Gary Peck, who is with the Sudbury branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society, told CBC News several people believe the Pine street rooming house was Sudbury's first hospital.

But Peck said it was most likely built as extra accommodation for a hotel.

"The Balmoral hotel [was] just down the street,” he said. “When they had more people wanting to stay than they had room for, at least [they] had this adjacent property to the west. And I think that's what it was for, was for housing."

The Algoma-Nipissing hospital was located in the empty lot beside the Pine street rooming house, Peck added.

It was Sudbury's third hospital and burned down in 1989.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.