Industrial pits lure partying teens away from parental eyes

Police in Sudbury say they're improving response times to emergency calls at the city's many industrial rock, sand and gravel pits.
At its Garson sand pit, Vale has created berms around the sand pit to stop vehicles from getting in, and has put in a locked gate and lots of 'no trespassing' signs. (Yvon Theriault/Radio-Canada)

Police in Sudbury say they're improving response times to emergency calls at the city's many industrial rock, sand and gravel pits.

Teens favour the pits as party spots far from parental eyes — but the fun has turned fatal twice at the Vale sand pit in Garson.

Currently a Sudbury teen is on trial for murder in the stabbing death of another man at a 2012 party.

And last July, 19 year-old Mathew Marcotte died of head injuries after being thrown from the back of a pick-up he and his friends were driving in the pit.

Stuart McCall (Yvon Theriault/Radio-Canada)

This year, police say they've plotted the fastest routes into the city's pits.

Staff sergeant Terry Rumford said their plan is ready in time for pit party season.

“Instead of trying to find our way there, we have maps now that particularly guide us to the point where they point out entrance points and exit points,” he said.

“[They were] developed just as an augmentation, an increased public service. It had nothing to do around any other incidents that had taken place.”

Stuart McCall lives not far from the sand pit on Goodwill Drive.

One tragedy was bad enough, “but when something else happens like that it potentially could give Goodwill Drive a bad name and we don't want to see that here,” he said.

McCall said the neighbourhood has been quieter lately.

A Vale spokesperson said the company created berms to stop vehicles getting into the Garson pit. It has also put in a locked gate and “no trespassing” signs.

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