A funeral was to be held Monday morning for well-known Sudbury union-leader Homer Seguin.

Seguin, who died Friday, spent 45 years working with the United Steelworkers, and worked to make the workplace safer and fought for job equility.

hi-homer-seguin-lu-852-4col

Homer Seguin, pictured when he received his honourary doctorate from Sudbury's Laurentian University. The long-time union leader, as well as health and safety advocate, died Friday at the age of 79. (Radio-Canada)

The funeral mass was to be held at Ste. Agnes Church in Azilda at 11a.m.

His work continued after his retirement, when he took a disability pension in 1992.

Nickel Belt MP Claude Gravelle worked with Seguin at the union hall. Gravelle said Seguin was sick for quite awhile with lung problems. He called the news of his death unfortunate.

"He was always a very, very hard worker and anybody who modeled themselves after Homer was successful because Homer was very passionate about whatever it was he was working on," Gravelle said in an interview with CBC News Friday.

"He was very passionate about it and he was a very, very good individual and a very good person."

Seguin’s obituary described as being "best known for his 45 years as a union leader in the Mine Mill and Smelter Workers and United Steelworkers and his efforts to provide healthy and safe work places, quality pay, job security, benefits and pensions for all workers."

Seguin, who died at 79 years of age, is survived by his wife, son, four daughters, 14 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.