Audio

Growing seniors population taxes homecare services in northeastern Ontario

The Northeast Community Care Access Centre says it's feeling the demand of seniors needing more complex home care.
The Community Care Access Centre connects people at home and in the community to health care services. The agency offers post-hospital care and help for those with chronic and complex needs. The CCAC serves 16,000 people in northeastern Ontario — half of whom are elderly. And that number is growing.
The aging population is needing more care than ever, especially at home. The Community Care Access Centre is finding new ways to serve while staying on budget. The CBC's Kate Rutherford spoke about this issue with the CEO for the CCAC, Richard Joly. 4:54
The Northeast Community Care Access Centre says it's feeling the demand of seniors needing more complex home care.
The agency serves 16,000 patients in the region, and more than half of them are elderly.
Northeast CCAC CEO Richard Joly said hospitals aren't keeping the elderly as long as they used to — and that means they're going home and needing more complicated support. (Kate Rutherford/CBC)

CCAC CEO Richard Joly said hospitals aren't keeping the elderly as long as they used to — and that means they're going home and needing more complicated support.

"[The] complexity has dramatically increased," he said.

"I would say, in the 30-40 per cent range, that we service more complex patients in the community."

But while demand for services is up, the CCAC's budget is staying the same.

"A lot of the time, financial resources don't allow" for the full range of care that more than 8,000 seniors at home, and in the community, Joly noted.

The agency is trying to find ways to be more efficient, he said.

Meanwhile, the CCAC continues to reach out to the community to educate people on the kind of services they offer.

At a recent CCAC information fair held at the Steelworkers Hall in Sudbury, people like Theresa Delacourt took time to familiarize herself with the agency's services.

He mother "is 88-years-old, so you never know when things happen quickly and [she'll] need assistance," she said.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.